HIV

What is HIV?

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a serious virus that destroys the immune system, and all infected people become prone to occasional infections and severe complications. HIV is the one that triggers Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or AIDS. As the immune system begins to weaken, white blood cells become incapable of resisting disease and fighting against germs, which would normally have resistance due to the immune system. For this reason, germs are staying in the body and multiply.

How is this infection transmitted?

The virus is transmitted sexually (classified as sexually transmitted disease), from mother to fetus and blood transfusions.

HIV is among the few viruses that are transmitted quite difficult, unable to survive outside the body. It cannot be contacted through air, sneezing, coughing, being dependent on liquids and heat.

Who is affected by HIV?

Anyone can get infected, no matter the sex or age.

What are the symptoms?

HIV infection is extraordinarily problematic because the main manifestations of the disease do not feel immediately compared to other sexually transmitted infections but after a period of time between 5 and 15 years.
Symptoms of HIV infection are similar to those of a common flu: fever, rash, runny nose, or frequent headache. These symptoms disappear after a few weeks and, even if the virus is inactive, it remains present and sexually transmitted. During this time, the virus can be detected by blood and cerebrospinal fluid analyzes.

After certain periods of time, different from person to person, the virus reactivates, begins to multiply again and AIDS develops, as well as the first clear symptoms of the infection:
– mouthwashes: the appearance of whitish spots at the tongue level;
– leucoplasia: appearance along the tongue, internal cheek face and oral mucus of white or gray spots. At this stage, the immune system starts fighting the infection. When the immune system starts to fail, the body becomes exposed to infections such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, meningitis or encephalitis, inflammations that can cause mental problems, including dementia. Also, visual disturbances, digestive problems and continuous bleeding may also occur.
After a few weeks or months, the body is overwhelmed by the complexity of the conditions, and the patient enters the last stages of the disease when, unfortunately, death can occur.

How do you prevent the infection?

HIV infection can be prevented by using a condom during sexual intercourse. In addition, we need to remain alert when we are in a situation where we need to make an injection or blood transfusion, although the sterile, disposable medical equipment it’s eliminating the chance of being infected with any disease.

There are good cases where the HIV-bearing pregnant woman does not transmit the virus to the baby, if she remains under the care of the doctor throughout her pregnancy and childbirth, which should be done via Caesarean section.

What is the treatment?

Unfortunately, at this time, there is no known cure that can completely cure man of the HIV virus. No immunization solutions have been found to prevent the development and spread of the virus in the body. Despite sustained efforts and ongoing research, the progress is slow.

Physicians have improved their ability to treat HIV-related illnesses and the mortality rate is decreasing.

The first clear symptoms of the infection:

– mouthwashes: the appearance of whitish spots at the tongue level;
– leucoplasia: appearance along the tongue, internal cheek face and oral mucus of white or gray spots. At this stage, the immune system starts fighting the infection.